1863-65: Samuel Chrisman Letters

These letters were written by Samuel Chrisman (1843-1926) while serving in Co. B, 23rd Missouri Infantry. Samuel is identified in regimental records as “Samuel Chrisman, Jr.” though he was not the son of Samuel Chrisman, but the son of John Chrisman (1810-1895) and Nancy Adams (1809-1886) of Grundy county, Missouri. I believe the designation “Jr.” was attached to Samuel’s record merely to distinguish him from his uncle, Samuel Chrisman — a 4’6″ tall farmer who enlisted in the same company in August 1861. [This Samuel Chrisman was identified as “Samuel Chrisman, Sr.” and later served in the 44th Missouri Infantry].

Samuel Chrisman’s enlistment record described him as standing 5′ 3″ tall with grey eyes and light hair — a native of Randolph, Indiana. His age was recorded as 18 at the time of his enlistment on 25 July 1862. Samuel’s record reveals that he was absent from the regiment “since 27 February 1864” at Christiana, Tennessee, while serving as a fifer. He was subsequently hospitalized at Division No. 1 USA Hospital at Murfreesboro, Tennessee for small pox during April 1864. In August 1864, during the Atlanta campaign,  he was on duty as a musician. He then marched with Sherman to the sea and north into the Carolinas. He was discharged from the 23rd Missouri in June 1865.

Samuel married Mary Ann Knapp (1846-1898) in August 1865. In the 1850 US Census, Samuel’s siblings included:

Catherine (1832-1868); she married Eldridge M. Stucker (1827-1897) in 1850.
Jacob (1834-1882); he married Mary Elizabeth Ishmael (1832-1861).
Mary (1837-1907);
Ann (1839-1909); she married David D. Barr (1834-1886) in 1859.
Hiram (1848-1920); he married Sarah C. Ells in 1868.

Samuel joined the 23rd Missouri Infantry after the Battle of Shiloh where the regiment was captured by Confederates on 6 April 1862 after eight hours of fighting at the sunken road. Most of the members of the 23rd were eventually paroled and sent to Benton Barracks in St. Louis where they were held several months before they were officially exchanged in August 1862. Various elements of the regiment served at different points in Missouri until 5 July 1863 when they were consolidated and ordered to Rolla.

The remainder of their service: Duty in District of Rolla until December 1863. Operations against Shelby October 7-22. Ordered to Nashville, Tenn., December 1863. Duty at Nashville and McMinnville and guarding Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad until July 1864. White County January 16, 1864. Atlanta Campaign July 10 to September 8. Chattahoochie River July 10-17. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. Operations in northern Georgia and northern Alabama against Forrest and Hood September 29-November 3. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Near Milledgeville November 23. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Carolinas Campaign January to April 1865. Fayette, N.C., March 11. Battle of Bentonville March 19-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett’s House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 17. Grand Review of the Armies May 24. Moved to Louisville, Ky., June, and duty there until July.


TRANSCRIPTION LETTER ONE

Barrett’s Station, St. Louis county, [Missouri]
January 21st 1863

Dear father and mother,

It is with great pleasure that I take my pen in hand to let you know that I am well at this time and I hope these few lines may find you all well too. I received your letter yesterday and was glad to hear from you all. I hant got a letter from you since I left Macon City — only them you sent by John N. Peterie ¹ and I had wrote three home. Tell [my brother] Hiram Chrisman that I don’t want to sell my dress coat.

I was vaccinated for the small pox yesterday. They have got them in St. Louis and in Franklin County.

I have been a chopping cord wood. We get $1 and 25 cents a cord for it.

We hant got our pay yet. It is the orders that [the] western army will be paid off right away. I was on a scout the other day and we got 2 prisoners and 2 shot guns and one revolver and took them to St. Louis where I am on guard tonight.

I think you ought to write oftener & tell Will Holloway to write. I forgot which wrote last — me or him. Write soon. I was glad to hear from you. I was so glad that I did [   ] to hear from home some time. Now Pap, I want you to write as soon as you get this without fail. Write without fail. The cars has just passed. John N. Peterie will get a discharge sure. That is Hiram Ishmael’s haversack. ² We have a nigger with us. His name is Red. He is a good nigger. So no more from Samuel Chrisman to John Chrisman and Nancy Chrisman and Cole & Cin & family.

A few lines to Dave [Barr]

I received yours and Pap’s letter. I was glad to hear from you. I jumped right up and says I, “I got a letter from my folks. I can now hear from them one time more.” So Dave, I hant much to write at this time. I am fat and sassy. I am fatter than I ever was in my life. Tell the gals that they musn’t brag for we will take them down a notch or 2. I am on guard tonight. Stand half the night. Our nigger is up with me. Tell John and Cole I will send you you a little gun apiece the first chance I get.

Dave, I have seen St. Louis and the Benton Barracks and the Mississippi River and the Missouri River. They are as big as Crooked Creek. The steamboat is as big as John’s Flute’s Mill. I haint much to write to write to write to write to write to write to write. I must bring my letter to a close. Write soon. Goodbye. — Samuel Chrisman


80293471_132110936097
Headstone of John N. Peterie

¹ John N. Peterie (1838-1863). John enlisted in Co B, 23rd Missouri Infantry on 26 August 1861 at Trenton, MO (age 23). Died of typhoid fever on 10 March 1863 at Good Samaritan Hospital in St. Louis. Reinterred at Jefferson Barracks in 1866.

² Hiram Ishmael enlisted in Co. B, 23rd Missouri Infantry, on 26 August 1861 to serve three years. He was discharged on 3 November 1864 at US Hospital No. 4 in Chattanooga, Tennessee. 


TRANSCRIPTION LETTER TWO

January 29th 1863

Dear father and mother and brother and sisters,

I just received your letter and was glad to hear from you all. I am well at present and I hope that these few lines will find you all well too. I received a letter from Pap and Dave Saturday. Dave, I have got 2 letters from you since I left Macon City.

The colonel [William P. Robinson] says that we will leave here soon and go to Pilot Knob in Arkansas. The small pox is in St. Louis and in our hospital one case of it only. I have been a chopping cord wood. I have only chopped 2 cords yet. That haversack is Hiram Ishmael’s. The boys is all well — only John N. Peterie and he will get a discharge and will be at home before long.

I sent mom a ring by Frank Rooks. I have sold $2 dollars and a quarter worth of them. If we leave here, we will go down the river — the Mississippi river — to Pilot Knob or some other place, I have forgot the name. Lieutenant [Samuel] Rooks ¹ has gone today to get guns for the paroled boys. ² I don’t think that we will stay here long now. It has been a warm winter down here. We won’t get our pay before the 10th of March, I don’t think. I hain’t got only about 3 dollars and I would like for you to send me 5 dollars and I some time before long if [I] can get off, I will come home. I would like to see Carlie now very well. — Samuel Chrisman

To John Chrisman and ?

A few lines to William Holloway,

I am well at this time. Hope these few lines may find you all well. I received your letter today and was glad to hear from you all. We expect to leave here soon and if we do, we will take the steamboat down the Mississippi River down to Pilot Knob. Hiram & Crum if they get too bad, you must cut them on the thumb or buy you a chain and chain them down to the ground. Tell Samuel Holloway that I can write him. I want you to tell him to write. I hain’t much to write soon to me. Tell Eldridge that I will buy him a little gun when I can and Johnny Barr, and Cabe too if ever I come home. So no more from Samuel Chrisman to Wm. Holloway. Family too.

Direct your letter:

Samuel Chrisman
Barrett’s Station
23rd Regt. Mo. Vols.
Co. B & BRR

Write soon


¹ 2d Lieutenant Samuel Rooks (1841-1903) of Co. B, 23rd Mo. Vols. is buried in Holloway Cemetery in Grundy county, Missouri. Samuel was the son of Uriah Rooks (1811-1878) and Rueanna Poff (1809-1881).

² The “paroled boys” is a reference to the members of the 23rd Missouri who were taken prisoner at the Battle of Shiloh on 6 April 1862 and detained at Benton Barracks near St. Louis until they were paroled.


TRANSCRIPTION LETTER THREE

Camp Jackson, St. Louis, MO
June 1st 1863

Dear father and mother and brother and sister,

I once more take my pen in hand to let you know that I am well and hearty at this time and I hope that when these few lines come to hand, they may find you all well too. No, Pap, I hain’t much to write — only the boys is all well and hearty now. I just got back from the City. I was on guard yesterday and last night I was guarding Secesh citizens and that was good guarding. I seen the finest time I ever did on guard in my life. They was all young women.

Now Pap, I will send you a half dollar’s worth of powder and 2 boxes of caps and 25 dollars in money by Rebecca Ann Scott and a letter now. I wish you was here to see the cannons. They are a plum sight. There is some sixty pounders and some bigger now. We don’t know how long that we will stay here. Now Pap, Hamey [John Hamilton] Chrisman has gone to be mustered in and Fred Mathna and Farrell — a man that came with us from the Pacific Railroad. We have got 3 niggers a cooking for our company now. I have just got back from the City and I got 60 cents worth of ammunition and when you get out, I will send you more if we are where we can get it. I want you to be saving with it.

Now I will tell you that we drawed new tents — six in a tent. There is 7 companies here now of our regiment and we are looking everyday for the other companies. I hain’t got no letter from you since Uncle Uriah Rook came down. I think you ought to write me every week. If you hain’t got no stamps, I can send you some. Now Pap, we are in Camp Gamble. If you direct your letters:

Mr. Samuel Chrisman
Co. B, 23rd Regiment Mo. Vols.
St. Louis, Mo.
Camp Gamble

Now if you direct your letters this way, they will come. I sent you that powder by Mahala Davis and caps. Now I hain’t anymore to write. So no more. From Samuel Chrisman to John Chrisman


TRANSCRIPTION LETTER FOUR

Camp Gamble, St. Louis, MO ¹
June 11th 1863

Dear father and mother and brother and sister,

I take my pen in hand to let you know that I am well and hearty at present and I hope that when these few lines come to hand, they may find you all well too. Now I can inform you that I received your letter today and was glad to hear from you. I had just got back from the City. We have to stand guard every other day and we have to walk about 4 miles pretty near every day and that is pretty hard. Our regiment does all the guarding in the City. They hain’t many soldiers here now. They have all gone to Vicksburg and other places.

There are three of the boys going to start home in a day or so. They are going in a furlough. Now I will give you their names — Benjamin Lesley [Leslie], John Phillips, and Peter Varner, and Sergt. [Theodore L.] Bolser and one more I can’t tell who. We can’t tell how long we will stay here but I think we will stay here for some time.

Now I will tell you that I seen 2 cannons yesterday I thought I could crawled in. I was at the Mississippi river yesterday and everyday I am on guard I go to the river.

I want you to write in the next letter where Dave [Barr] ² and Will is at and what is the number of the regiment that they are in so I can write to them. You said you had bought Old Gray [but] you never said how much you give for him. Now I have got that watch yet. I am a going to get it fixed now soon.

This letter is all the one that I have got from home since the 20th of May and I have wrote some 3 or 4 since then. We have to stand guard every other day and it is pretty hard on us. There is several of the boys that is failing. We do all the guarding in the City now. I would like to be at home a week or two. I haven’t seen any corn since we left the railroad and it was just coming up. I would like to see some corn now. Pap, I will tell you I seen two cannons that the balls weigh 100 & 60 pounds. That was a big gun.

I think if they keep on giving furloughs, I will get to come home some time this fall or winter. I can’t tell. we think Vicksburg will be taken soon and if it is taken, the war will soon end. There are batteries — 3 or 4 — has left here in the last week and they all say they are going to Vicksburg.

Now I hain’t anything else to write today so I shall stop writing. So no more. Write soon. This from Samuel Chrisman

to John Chrisman and C___ and all.


¹ Camp Gamble was a tent city in St. Louis named for the provisional governor of Missouri (Hamilton R. Gamble). It was situated in Lindell Grove, a woods between Olive, Grand, Compton, and Laclede, where there was a state militia encampment. It had previously been named Camp Jackson.

² I presume this is David Barr (1834-1886) who married Samuel sister, Ann Chrisman, in 1858. David served with Co. G, 4th Missouri E. M. Cavalry.


TRANSCRIPTION LETTER FIVE

Camp Gamble, St. Louis, Mo.
July 7th 1863

Dear father and mother,

It is with great pleasure that I take my pen in hand to let you know that I am well and hearty at this time and I hope when these few lines come to hand, they may find you all well and hearty. Now Pap, I sent you a box expressed — a box of clothes [with] one blanket, one blouse, one overcoat, 2 pants, one drawers, [and] one hat. The hat has got a bugle on it and a band on it. You must come to Chillicothe and get them. Hiram Ishmael [sent] one hat with a feather in it, and one shirt. Uncle George [sent] 2 blankets, one dress coat, and Sam Lord [sent] one pair of socks. My name is on all of my things [with] a little strip of paper.

There has just come a dispatch from Vicksburg [stating Vicksburg] is taken and if it is so, it is good on our side. This here is what we heard just 2 minutes ago. Now I hain’t much to write today so no more. Write soon.

From Samuel Chrisman to John Chrisman

Now we have more news. We have got our marching orders. They say that we will go down the river. They say we will go to Helena [Arkansas]. It is about 600 miles from here. We got our pay yesterday. I got 26 dollars. If I get a chance — a good chance — I will send you some money but if you only got 20 dollars, I will mind who I send it by. I will be saving with it. I will send you the receipt for that box of clothes. You must keep the receipt and go to Chillicothe and get the box.

We have to start at 5 o’clock today. I want you to write as soon as you get this. Now I must bring my letter to a close by saying goodbye. Write soon.

From — Samuel Chrisman to John Chrisman


TRANSCRIPTION LETTER SIX

Camp Nash near Rolla [Missouri]
August 27th 1863

Dear father and mother and brother and sister,

It is with great pleasure that I take my pen in hand to let you know that I am well and hearty at this time and I hope that these few lines may find you all well & hearty. I received your letter and was glad to hear from you and to hear that you was well. Now I will tell you that the Rebels attacked our cavalry this morning and killed 2 of them and wounded 2 about 5 miles from here and we look for them to attack us. They are out scouting now with 25 of Co. A and [paper torn] of the other companies. The boys is all well as common and looking for a ….. will get back tonight. If he gets back at the right time I would like to be at [     ] but I don’t expect I will get to come home till my time is out.

We are still chopping timber to build a fort at Rolla. I haven’t [    ] only [  ] or [  ] days. since we came out here and volunteered, then I don’t have to do anything — only play the fife and that ain’t hard to do, When I write to one, I write to all.

Now I will tell you that I answer every letter that I get. I don’t think you do.

A few lines to Mary. I am well and I hope these few lines may find you well. I received your letter. Well, that is as much as you wrote me. So no more. Write soon, from — Samuel Chrisman and Mary Jane Holloway. Keep on writing.

The [         ] still keeps robbing the stage and catching one or two soldiers out alone and they [   ] them. There is good news in the papers for peace and I hope it will be soon. So no more. Write soon.

from Samuel Chrisman to John Chrisman and Mary and all, Hiram Chrisman and all the rest. Write without fail.


TRANSCRIPTION LETTER SEVEN

Christiana, Tennessee
March 15th 1864

Dear Brother and friend,

It is with great pleasure that I seat myself to let you know that I amwell and hearty at this time and I truly hope that when these few lines come to hand, they may find you well and doing well. I can inform you that I received your letter last night and I was glad to hear from you and to hear you was well and a doing well. We left McMinnville on the 23rd of February and got here on the 28th of February. We had to walk but I had my knapsack [paper creased].

You said you and Columbus [Knapp] was a going in the service. You take my advice and don’t go in. Wait till I come home and I will go again and we will go together. We will go in the Navy on some war  ship or in some artillery — that is the easiest place we can go. If I ever go in again, I will go into the Navy. Now take my advice and wait till I come home and I will learn you to play the fife and then you will have a easy time. Then you won’t have to stand guard nor drill and you can save your clothes and get to sleep every night. I guess we all will be mustered out at once in August sometime. The news now is that we will go into the Army of the Potomac and if we go there, we will get to see Washington City and Cincinnati, Baltimore, and a heap of other towns too tedious to name now.

I will tell you something about the girls. They are plenty down here and the love soldiers mighty well and the [paper creased]  Co. B is about 8 miles from here. I [was] down at the company going on two weeks ago — me and John Ells — and stayed all night with the boys and was at meeting on Sunday and there was more girls there than I ever seen in one gang.

So no more, — Samuel Chrisman to Hiram Chrisman and family

A few words to Columbus Knapp,

I am well and can ride you and one like you. I am heavier than I ever was in my life. I weigh 100 and 48 pounds and my belly sticks a way out and I am fat and sassy. I will give you a little advice. Stay at home till you learn something about the service. If you go in, you will be sorry of it. You don’t know anything about staying away from home. I have got hardened to it and it ain’t so bad and when I come home, if I don’t like to stay, I will will go into the Navy on some war ship.

Now I want you [to] tell the girls to sleep enough to do them 6 months for we won’t let them sleep any after we come home. Now I have wrote a heap more than you did. If you write a big letter, I will too. I will bring my letter to a close by saying write soon and often and I will do the same.

Samuel Chrisman to Mr. Columbus Knapp

Direct your letter to:

Mr. Samuel Chrisman, Co. B, 23rd Regt. Mo. Vols., Christiana, Tennessee


TRANSCRIPTION LETTER EIGHT

Tullahoma, Tennessee
June the 4, 1863 [should be 1864]

Dear father and mother,

It is with great pleasure that I seat myself to let you know that I am well and hearty. I ain’t as stout as I was before I had the small pox but I think I will soon be as stout as ever. I got to the company [a] day or so before it left McMinnville. I walked pretty near all the way. Now Pap, you will give you some advice. You had better get Hiram and all of the rest of the children vaccinated as quick as you can for if the small pox would get up there & they would play Smash with the people and if anyone was to have it, don’t give them any water not eat no grease nor drink no milk. Drink tea and coffee. I never was vaccinated and it went pretty hard with me. I had to lay seventeen days flat of my back that I wasn’t out of my bed, I didn’t drink any water for three weeks. All of the boys is well. There was 2 of our company died while they was at McMinnville with the small pox — Allen Garner and Edwin [T.] Henderson. So enough of that.

Me and Uncle Mike ¹ and some more expressed a box to Aunt Lydia. I sent one fine dress coat and a hat with a cord around it and one fife to Hiram. Now mom, put my coat and hat in the trunk and keep them until I get home, The black fife is mine. Now pap, I did not draw any money this time. I was at the hospital and I did not draw. But when I draw I will get lots of it. So I will tell you, [we] will leave here in the morning and go to the front. It is about one hundred and fifty miles. So I will bring my letter to a close. So no more at present.

— Samuel Chrisman to John Chrisman and Nancy Chrisman


¹ Michael Chrisman was 42 years old when he enlisted in March 1862 in Co. B, 23rd Missouri Infantry. He stood 5’8″ tall, had a sandy complexion, blue eyes, and sandy hair. He was a miller by occupation, like Samuel’s father. He was discharged at Fayetteville, North Carolina in March 1865.


TRANSCRIPTION LETTER NINE

Atlanta, Georgia
September 29, 1864
1Brig., 3rd [Division] 14th Army Corps

Dear sister and brother,

It is with great pleasure that I seat myself to let you know that I am well and hearty at this time and I truly hope that when these few lines comes to hand, they may find you all well and doing well.

No Ann, I will answer your letter which I got some 2 or 3 weeks ago and I have not answered it. The reason I didn’t answer it, I thought I would get to come home when the rest of the boys did and I wasn’t very well. Excuse me this time and I will not do so any more. You may look for me at home when my time is out and I don’t think I will get to home any sooner. You must save cornbread a week. Me and Hamey [John Hamilton Chrisman] and Uncle Mike [Chrisman] can eat three of the biggest pones you can bake. We can eat them at once.

Now Ann, tell little Johnney his uncle is well and would give anything in the world to get to see him and all the rest of the children but here I am over a thousand miles from home. I hated to see the boys start home and I had to stay. If I live to get out, I don’t think they can lie and get me in anymore. There is between three and four hundred left of us and they will about half of them go out in about one month and then what will become of us. I can’t tell. We have only six officers with us now and they will all go out in one month — all but the Lieutenant Colonel and he ain’t fit to command a dog. So enough of that.

Our regiment is on picket today and it is a rainy day. It rains about half the time down here.

If there is any weddings up there, write and tell me. I have time to write a big letter and I will write the paper full.

The most of the army is building winter quarters here. There isn’t any talk of a fall campaign. I hope there will be none. Our regiment ain’t [received] any orders to build winter quarters but the balance of our brigade has orders. I think our regiment will go to the rear and garrison some place. So I will keep in good heart of seeing you all soon. Read this to Pap. So no more. This from Samuel Chrisman to Ann Barr and David Barr, the squire of Grundy township.

A few lines to Pap. I am well and I hope these few lines may find you well. I hain’t drawed any money yet and I don’t think we will draw soon. I have signed the pay roll for 10 months pay but I don’t look to draw until my time is out if we stay down here. I have received 3 or 4 letters from you in the last month. I have wrote 2 or 3. I sent one by Uncle George and I sent some powder by James [D.] Fleshman. You get half of the powder. I would [have] sent you some lead if it wasn’t so heavy to carry and all of the boys had all they could carry. I will bring lots of it when I come home. So give my love and best respects to all inquiring friends — especially to the girls and so forth. So turn over and I shoo them ducks out bobtail.

This from Samuel Chrisman to John Chrisman and Nancy Chrisman [and] Hiram Chrisman


TRANSCRIPTION LETTER TEN

Rome, Georgia
October 30, 1864

Dear father and mother,

It is with great pleasure that I seat myself to let you know that I am well and hearty at this time and I truly hope that these few lines may find you all well and doing well. If not, I would be sorry to hear of it. We have just got in camp. We will get our pay in a few days, I guess, and I will send you what I draw. I don’t know whether I will get 10 or 12 months pay.

Now I will tell you something about our march. We have had a hard march. We left Atlanta in the 3rd of October and have been marching all the time. We have marched from 15 to 20 miles every day since we left except of eight days [when] we was in Alabama and we had to forage all we got to eat. There was a mill where we was camped and we got corn meal to make mush. We haven’t had any salt for a week but we have got where we can get rations now. I will tell you that we lived fat when we was in Alabama, We had all the sweet potatoes we could eat and fresh meat. There was men detailed to kill hogs and everything they could get find and we burnt one town and 2 big mills — one had six pair of burrs and several houses.

The rebels tore up our railroad — about 15 miles — and we got [with]in hearing of muskets twice but the rebels went as fast as we did. They had a fight at Altoona where we stayed 11 days as we went down and our men shipped them, I guess. The road is alright now. We were 3 days behind when they had the fight Saturday.

Now I will say tell all of the boys that come home that we all like old Quinn [?] better than we did Col. [William P.] Robinson. He has turned out to be a gentleman, I think. So give my best respects to Mr. G. Peterie and all of the boys that is at home. I only have a few minutes to write in. I wrote you a letter in Alabama a few lines. So they are calling for the mail now. Direct as you always have. So no more at present. I still remain your affectionate son until death. So goodbye. — Samuel Chrisman to John Chrisman and Nancy Chrisman and Hiram Chrisman and all of the family.

I haven’t time to write anymore — only I feel mighty sore over our hard day’s march yesterday and today we will get to rest a few days.


TRANSCRIPTION LETTER ELEVEN

Goldsboro, North Carolina
April 6th 1865

Dear father and mother,

It is with great pleasure that I seat myself to let you know that I am well and hearty and I truly hope that these few lines may find you all well and doing well. So enough of that. Well, I have received several letters from you since I came here and I was glad to hear from you and to hear that you all was well and doing well. That was good news but I will write better news on the other side than that and you will say when you read it the best news I ever heard since the war commenced and so turn and read what is on the other side.

Well here comes the news. Richmond is ours and 25 thousand prisoners and 500 hundred pieces of cannons and General A. P. Hill. Now you can say whether it is good or not. The news is official. It was read to us after coming in off drill. The troops have been cheering all day and one hundred cannons will fire at 12 o’clock today. So as I hain’t no letter to answer, I won’t write much. I thought I would write you a few lines to let you know the news but I expect you will hear it before this letter gets here. We was a going to start on another campaign soon but I don’t know where it will be now. So no more.

— Samuel Chrisman to John and Nancy Chrisman

Write soon.


TRANSCRIPTION LETTER TWELVE

Richmond, Virginia
May 8th 1865

Dear father and mother,

I seat myself to let you know that I am well and hearty but I feel pretty hard over our hard march. We marched over eighty miles in three days and it was very hot. I hope you are well.

We left the railroad 8 miles from Raleigh on the last day of April and got here yesterday. So you needn’t write anymore. We will start to Washington City in the morning to be mustered out and we will be mustered out before the first of June. So I have got a pass to go to Richmond on a visit and I won’t write anymore at this time. So no more now.

I will be at home in two or three weeks. We have 75 miles yet to march. We can march it in three days. So I won’t write anymore. I may write when I get to Washington. So no more.

— Samuel Chrisman to John and Nancy Chrisman and all of the family


 

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